See How One School Improved Science Grades

Improved grades. Fulfilled Next Generation Science Standards. Saved time. Those are just a few of San Luis Obispo High School’s accomplishments thanks to resources like Gale’s Science In Context. Download their success story and learn how transitioning to engaging digital resources also helped them: • prepare students for research success in college • meet other curriculum … Read more…

Election Scandal, Russian Spies, and FBI Surveillance

Five new collections in Archives Unbound containing declassified Federal Bureau of Investigation internal files digitized for the first time give researchers an unprecedented view of the state of government surveillance in times of great political and social upheaval in the United States. New Titles: FBI File: House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC) FBI File: Alger … Read more…

InfoTrac: A Trusted Source for Current, Accurate, and Balanced News

| By Sara Constantakis |

In our internet-driven world, news comes at us from every direction and from many different sources. But just because a news story shows up in our Facebook or Twitter feed doesn’t mean it’s credible or authoritative. The proliferation of fake news is a growing problem, since the internet makes it easy for anyone to publish something that looks like a real news story. In addition, many news publications lean in one direction or another on the political spectrum, which influences the way they present information. That’s why it’s important for everyone, from the student to the general reader, to understand where news comes from and how the source of an article may influence its presentation of the facts.

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Headlines In Context: Comparing the Watergate Scandal to Russia’s Election Meddling Investigation

| By Debra Kirby |

Keeping up with current events can be a full-time job—never mind understanding the history behind what’s in the headlines. Take the ongoing coverage of the investigation of Russian involvement in the 2016 U.S. Presidential elections for example. This story seems to change daily—sometimes hourly. Even if you’re checking in multiple times per day and managing to keep up with the basics, references to historical events and underlying facts relayed by experts and political pundits can leave you wanting to learn more.

For instance, a number of commentators, when discussing the recent firing of FBI director James Comey by President Trump, have referenced similarities to Nixon’s firing of Watergate Special Prosecutor Archibald Cox. Is that a valid reference?

To get the background details needed to better understand what’s behind these and other references, start your research with U.S. History In Context, where you will discover in-depth coverage of such topics as:

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Prepare for LGBTQ Pride Month with Historical Primary Sources!

To many Americans, the focus on LGBTQ issues has come to the forefront of the news over the last few years, with greater visibility of struggles and much public discussion of issues that were rarely ever acknowledged by society.  And while many are still working to fully understand the differences between “L/G,” “B,” “T,” and “Q,” a greater general awareness of gender and sexuality matters has recently begun entering the American consciousness.  But, activism in this area has been alive and well for many years.  As this CNN.com article outlines, LGBTQ rights organizations began forming as early as 1924.

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You Think You Know What Librarians Do?

| Originally publish on BubbleUp Classroom by Corey Thornblad|

This week I had the pleasure of participating in the annual Virginia Association of School Librarians conference in Norfolk, Virginia. I’ll admit that I was a fish out of water — the only teacher in a sea of school librarians. Even though I don’t know much about the Dewey Decimal system or online catalogs, they made me feel right at home.

As I sat at dinner, listening to their conversation about teaching and learning, I realized that unless you have had the privilege of working in a school over the past decade you may not understand what school librarians actually do.  Librarians are not a braggy bunch; so I feel inclined to set the record straight on their behalf. You probably think they spend their entire day shelving and checking out books, while shushing students. It’s time to set aside these stereotypes and give librarians their long overdue kudos.

Librarians teach — a lot 
First and foremost, school librarians are teachers. If you walk into our school’s library on any given day you are likely to see one of our librarians co-teaching or independently teaching a lesson. In order to pull this off, librarians have to be content experts in everything from science to math to PE. Moreover, librarians have the ability and desire to teach children of all levels and learning styles.

Librarians are Apple Geniuses in disguise
Librarians know A LOT about technology. Our librarians are the go-to teachers in our building for everything tech. They help us search the web, use Twitter, create our own websites, and help us learn how to use Google Classroom.

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The Macmillan Interdisciplinary Handbooks: Philosophy Series is an “Excellent Source”

Supporting the knowledge of philosophy can be tough, but it doesn’t have to be with the Macmillan Interdisciplinary Handbooks: Philosophy Series. Using film, literature, art, case studies, and other disciplines, the handbooks provide illustrations of human experiences to work as gateways to questions philosophers try to address. Composed of ten volumes (available individually) that serve undergraduate college students who have had little or no exposure to philosophy, as well as the curious lay reader, the Macmillan Interdisciplinary Handbooks: Philosophy Series is recommended for undergraduate and public libraries.

See how the Macmillan Interdisciplinary Handbooks: Philosophy Series is a must have resource with two reviews posted in the American Reference Books Annual, Spring 2017 Edition:

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A Look Inside Gale’s Reading Mentor Program

| By Caroline Drexler |

Background

I began my career at Gale as a library sales consultant in February of 2000, moving to my current customer success manager role in 2016. Within my first two years at Gale, I heard about an organization working with students at the local elementary school since 1998 called the Hillside Mentor program. At the time Laurie Fundukian was heading up this program, she worked in the editorial department at Gale for over 17 years.

Typically, each fall the Hillside Mentor team reaches out to the school to determine the start date of the program—we solicit Gale folks to get volunteers. Normally, we get about 30 volunteers, but there is no limit due to the massive amount of kids requesting help. Usually, one or two students are assigned a mentor, for one hour every week. We meet with the student in the library or classroom and read to them while they eat lunch, while trying to encourage them to read to us. Some days, we play a game or talk but as a mentor, our job is to improve their skills by encouraging them to read.

Dylan’s Story

When I joined the program I was assigned a student who was not only a poor reader, but also had many challenges at home.  His name was Dylan, a kindergartner at Hillside Elementary, who was living with his grandparents. He was never read to as a child and dealt with the immense struggles of a missing father and drug addicted mother. I could tell he was a very curious child, but had issues focusing on a specific task.

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Public Libraries Help Solve California’s Dropout Problem

Today, nearly 40 million adults lack their high school diploma. Your library can play a key role in re-engaging adults into the education system, with Career Online High School, part of the world’s first accredited private online school district. Along with academic coaches, certified teachers, and technical support staff, your library can help these students realize … Read more…

Local Libraries Expand Offerings with Gale Courses

Gale Courses supports libraries as educational institutions and gives community members easy access to lifelong learning opportunities including professional development, technology, and personal enrichment courses. Tied to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ fastest-growing occupations, Gale Courses covers a variety of career topics, positioning the library to drive local economic development and meet demand for the top workplace skills. Gale Courses provides more than 365, six-week long online programs taught by college instructors who are experts in their field.

See how Lemont Public Library is using Gale Courses to foster positive change in their community with a Chicago Tribune newsletter!

To support continuing education in your community with Gale Courses, request a trial today!

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